What can we learn from Murray’s Friendship Graph?

20 Aug
  • Murray: Now, we’ve known each other for quite some time in the professional realm. I’d like to push things forward in the Friendship realm.
  • Conchords: What’s the Friendship realm?
  • Murray: Well, you’ve heard of a realm – yeah?
  • Conchords: Er, yes.
  • Murray: Well, this is like a friendship one; a group of people basically getting together, calling each other friends…Look at this.
  • Conchords: What’s this?
  • Murray: A friendship graph; look along here on the x axis – that represents time passing, on the y axis here, that represents the different levels of friends. Okay? We’re starting up here with friends, down to workmates, colleagues, strangers (which is pretty  much everyone I’ve noticed) …and then enemies.

 We’re pretty comfortable navigating our social relationships by classifying them more or less in the same way as Murray rather bluntly describes. Up until 5 or so years ago   it has been very easy for people to segment their ‘realms’ and to vary their behaviour according to whether we’re in the company of ‘friends, workmates, colleagues, strangers or … enemies’.

However, now social media usage has become so widespread, with 26million Facebook users in the UK , many of us are increasingly faced with the quesiton of how best to communicate consistently and with integrity across ‘the friendship graph’ and how best to draw together a fragmented online and offline identity across a wide variety of social networking platforms, including the office, the pub and your living room sofa. 

 The thing is that many people seem to be a bit confused about how to get the most out of the new networks available without compromising traditional ones.  The key to making social media work for you lies entirely in your own hands, through taking pro-active control of the online networks that you use and the way you use them:

 If you get it right, then people will be able to engage with you online in one persona that pretty much reflects the real, offline you in all your rounded and lustrous glory. If you get it wrong, as many of us do, then it could well be a case of coming over as someone with a split personality, or maybe just giving us all TMI. People don’t want to be dragged up the friendship graph by force of your ‘fab nites oot!!!’ Facebook album! As you can see from the Conchords’ efforts, you might end up jettisoning your ‘workmates’ into the ‘strangers’ realm before you know it.

 

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3 Responses to “What can we learn from Murray’s Friendship Graph?”

  1. Christabel August 20, 2010 at 9:04 am #

    Managing social networks can be a lot of effort. I have my Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts. Add in Bebo and excuse my dated knowledge Friends Reunited and when do I have time to speak to my friends….

  2. cased August 20, 2010 at 9:09 am #

    Such are the problems of modern life Christabel! You might find this link interesting – thinking about whether or not to combine different online identities. http://www.eoghann.com/2010/03/the-online-identity-crisis-in-social-networks

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